Touring Singapore Chinatown with the 500CM

During the last outings of the Leica User Group Singapore (LUGS) of 2019, I had the good idea to carry the Hasselblad 500CM loaded with my favorite film: the Rollei Retro 80s

I love the range of grays and the profound black that this film can produce. This is not all art but a nice walk with friends at a time when this was possible. I put the full roll, no censorship and some edition in Lightroom. Film was was processed at the usual lab (Ruby Photo) and scanned at home of Epson v800.

 

Touring Singapore Chinatown with the 500CM

A NIGHT TRIP TO SENOKO FISHERY PORT (Film version)

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This is  a small follow-up to my former post : A NIGHT TRIP TO SENOKO FISHERY PORT .

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These pictures were shot on Cinestill 800T with a Leica M6 with Summicron 35 Asph v2 or 50mm V5. Processed at the lab around the corner and scanned at home with the Epson v800.

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I shot the roll at 640 ISO, still I found the pictures being under exposed, unlike the roll I shot in Tokyo last year.

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She is the boss.

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A NIGHT TRIP TO SENOKO FISHERY PORT (Film version)

A night trip to Senoko fishery port

So after the Road Side vegetables market of Toa Payoh we are heading north to Senoko fishery port. There is wholesale fish market providing stock from local fish trawlers, in-shore vessels and fish farms as well as imported sources, and distributes to markets, supermarkets, food courts and restaurants across Singapore

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The market is located at 31 Attap Valley Road, Singapore 759908; east to Woodlands checkpoint. It is lucky hat one of my friends was driving otherwise it would have been  difficult to get there and back.

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Around midnight the market starts to be busy. Individuals come here for cheaper seafood particularly in this time coming up to Chinese new year.L1009668

But the market is also preparing orders for hawkers, wet markets and the restaurants of Singapore.

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The place is busy, the ground slippery, that’s a nice small adventure.

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You can find different products types, like crabs, prawns and fish from all types.

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Each company have its own delimited concrete square , with scales and a boss, noting down orders

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The work of others is always a nice show to behold.

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People are quite friendly, I did not really go asked not to take a picture, but the place is very busy so mind not standing in the way.

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Prawns or shrimps arriving and being thrown to the ground. They will be sorted manually later.

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Outside more fish is coming.

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Ice is a big business here.

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All shots Leica M262, Summilux 50mmv2

A night trip to Senoko fishery port

Mullik Ghat Flower Market – Calcutta

Situated at the southeast end of Howrah Bridge, between the Ganges and the railway, the flower market is a fascinatingly colorful attraction.

This is a wholesale market, not one where you are supposed to buy flowers as a tourist.

The morning we were there the place was reasonably busy, it gets a bit cramped in the covered area, but not to the point of being unbearable (although I can imagine this can be the case from time to time).

 

There are plenty of nice spots inside or outside where you can stay without being too much on the way and take pictures. This is a business place, but I think people are ok to have their photo taken, maybe do not shoot at money exchanges.

 

On the way from the avenue to the market itself, you can see the makeshift shacks where many workers live in, but also some small workshops (workshacks maybe?) where people are mending cyclecarts, or making wooden boxes to transport the flowers.


This is the kingdom of marigold.

Mullik Ghat Flower Market – Calcutta

Calcutta – The potters colony

The first stop of our fourth trip to India was Calcutta, or Kolkata as it is called now.

At first I was very excited to go to India at the period of Diwali the festival of lights, but it turned out that is is more a private event celebrated at home than something you can experience in the street. True, the cities were all lighted-up and people were busy shopping for lights and decorations for their homes. Actually, that week was just after the Durga puja which is a popular celebration in West Bengal, but also the week of Kali Puja which is another big celebration in the area. And particularly in Calcutta.

If we were first struck on the night of our arrival by the number of people sleeping in the street, we were also very surprised to see number of bamboo structures being erected across the city. This, were we told, was for the construction of temporary temples for the upcoming Kali puja.

The next day one of the highlights of our tour was the “potters colony” or Kumartuli. I did not do much research before and was afraid to be inflicted one of the pseudo artisanal attractions you see from time to time. It turned out that the potters colony is the place where these craftsmen are building statues of deities (or idols as our guide reffer to them) for the various celebrations of the hindu year. That week all the colony was busy making statues of Kali for the upcoming festival.


The highly decorated statues present Kali, with a necklace of severed demons heads that she defeated but also stepping on her husband Shiva, she generally has her tongue sticking out. The explanation we were given can also be found on wikipedia:

Once Kali had destroyed all the demons in battle, she began a terrific dance out of the sheer joy of victory. All the worlds began to tremble and sway under the impact of her dance. So, at the request of all the Gods, Shiva himself asked her to desist from this behavior. However, she was too intoxicated to listen. Hence, Shiva lay like a corpse among the slain demons in order to absorb the shock of the dance into himself. When Kali eventually stepped upon Shiva, she realized she was trampling and hurting her husband and bit her tongue in shame.

It is difficult to imagine that so many statues will found someone to buy them; but they actually do. Strolling through the colony you can see statues of various shapes, colors and sizes; but all describing the same scene. You will see idols at various stages of their completion, from gross straw shapes, to fully finished ones. Most of the statues will have their head covered if they are not finished. Artists are painting the fine details of eyes or decorations, some even using spray paint for shades.

All pictures with Nikon D700 + Nikkor 17-35F2.8D, I use a polarizing filter mostly all the on this lens.

Calcutta – The potters colony

Incredible India

Jodpur

Back from 12 days in “Incredible India”, in Delhi, Agra and Rajasthan. I carried over my DSLR but also the Hasselblad, nearly 10KG of stuff all in all including the tripod, but luckily we were travelling in hum , well,good conditions . Films have turned up from the lab yesterday and I started scanning them.

This old guy sits in the fort of Jodpur to be shot by tourist so don’t over estimate the picture.

Camera: Hasselblad 500 CM
Lens: 80mm F2.8 Planar
Film: Kodak Portra 400 NC
Scanner: Epson v500

Incredible India

Waiting for the year of the dragon

Waiting for the year of the dragon
Waiting for the year of the dragon

First Film of the year ! Yeehah.

Stroll around Waterloo street in Singapore before the Chinese New Year. I asked this gentleman for the picture. I focused on his hand and his ring, not a to good oof effect. But I did not know how long I could wait before shooting.

Camera: Hasselblad 500 CM
Lens: 80mm F2.8 Planar
Film: Fuji Reala 100
Scanner: Epson v500

Waiting for the year of the dragon

The old man at the well – Borobudur – Indonesia,

Around Borobudur temple, in one of the small temples outside of the city, we strolled in the surrounding village and this guy talked to our guide then showed us how his well was working.

Time for a shot I said.

Camera: Hasselblad 500CM, Planar 80mm F2.8
Film: Kodak Portra 400 NC
Scanning: EPSON V500, Lightroom 3, PSP Elements 4

The old man at the well – Borobudur – Indonesia,

Michelangelo

Michelangelo

Back from a tour outside Mandalay we entered the town by some neighborhoods featuring artisans making different type of crafts. In one of the street were the marble Buddha sculptors. A whole street of them!
I could not resist to have the car pull on the side of the street and go out to take a couple of pictures. This portrait is a half miss but I still like it. This guy had a very special look, full of marble dust, with his mouth bright red with betel juice.

Camera: Nikon D700
Lens: Nikkor 50mm F1.8 D
Retouches: Lightroom 3

Michelangelo