How the Leica III let me down on the green corridor

All was looking well when I was walking away from the Bukit Timah railway station, but the Leica had a surprise in stock. This time it is a white band on the right side of the frame. Posts suggest this is an issue with the curtain or with some light seal at the front of the camera where the slow speed dial is. Well I think I have to send the little fellow to be serviced sometime soon. Anyway here are a few more shots of the walk.

Bukit Timah railway station

Singapore is quite a compact city/country so even the green corridor is crossed by several roads, I should rather say highways, which make the walk a bit noisy, but nonetheless enjoyable.

Bridge over the green corridor

This is a typical colonial Black and White house, legacy of the british times; I cannot say for sure but I think this should not be far from Wessex Village,

A black and white house in the greenery

Interesting things can be seen along the corridor, a mosque, a temple or shrine, a mechanics where I used the drink selling machine, a couple of shacks like this one. and in some places old folks sitting in the shade with their belongings close, discussing among peers.

A shack along the road

This is the final sign: No it says. At te back you can see the cranes of the harbour.

No Trespassing

Camera; Leica IIIC

Lens: Industar 22, 50mmF3.5

Film: Kodak Tri-x

How the Leica III let me down on the green corridor

The green corridor – Singapore

It’s already a coupe of years back since the railway station in Tanjong Pagar was closed moved to Woodlands close to the Malaysian border. To give an idea to the reader with no knowledge on Singapore geography, Tanjong Pagar in in the south side of the island and the border is at the north. For the small story the station, the tracks and the land below were Malaysian property. So a couple of years back, the station (see here) was closed, the tracks removed (and returned to Malaysia) and an exchange of land and other compensation was done. So was born the green corridor, the former railway from the south of Singapore to the border of Malaysia.

Sometime on August, after a brunch at Rider’s Cafe and a drive along the border with my friend Oliver, I was dropped at the former Bukit Timah railway station (in the middle of the corridor) and walked 10 KM south until I reach a “No trespassing” sign before getting to the old station area. I carried the Hassie with 2 backs and the Leica III (That will be for next post).

 

The bridge over Upper Bukit Timah road
The bridge over Upper Bukit Timah road

The bridge across Bukit Timah road and the railway station are the most interesting items to see, there lay the last meters of track.

The bridge over Upper Bukit Timah road
The bridge over Upper Bukit Timah road

After (or before) this point the green corridor is a dirt track between trees; very green and very blue this day as well.

The green and blue corridor
The green and blue corridor

The city is never far however and you can never forget the constructions nor the noise of the traffic. Maybe going upwards to Malaysia is different, but going south to the sea you can;t forget Singapore is a dense and busy city.

Habitation blocks along the green corridor
Habitation blocks along the green corridor

 

Color shots done with Fuji slides, 100 ISO. All scanned with Epson v500, adjusted with Lightroom 3.6.

Image

Multiple photo systems for the travel

Give me some Noodles, Uncle.
Give me some Noodles, Uncle.

I don’t know about you, but I have having gear taking dust at home while I am enjoying myself with my favorite camera system on a once in a lifetime trip.

Also I cherish the idea that carrying a different camera format will let me bring back home a broader range of pics. I then end up carrying two cameras (and sometime a point and shoot for my son).

First things first, I am a Nikon shooter. My common camera is a D700, that I usually bring for each outing. My best combo is the 17-35 2.8, the 50D1.8 and a 70-200D2.8.

I have brought different second cameras in my past holidays and here are a summary of my thoughts:
– Agfa Isolette III: The Agfa has been my second camera since the early 90’s where I was shooting with a Minolta SRT101. It is great because the medium format fulfill the requirement of providing a different type of pictures. The quality once scanned is amazing. This is a small camera but has no metering so you need to carry a light Metter. Of course with age, the Agfa is at this time in not such a great condition and it’s a pitty to miss those great shots.

– Leica M4: king of camera is it? Small, a bit heavier than the Agfa, friendly looking but no mettering. I love shooting with the Leica. However, I think the drawback is the film format. 35mm is the same as full frame DSLR, so I always end up asking myself why bother?

– Nikon F3, Nikon F4: that’s the good news. One manual, one autofocus; one small one big. Although they have the same drawback as the Leica in term of film format, they are more interesting because they share the same lenses as my DSLR. So I can act as a real pro with two bodies, each with a different lens, so I end up taking different pictures. And if I want to swap lenses it’s even easier with two bodies than with a pouch. Only drawback, my latest AF lenses are not great for manual focus on the F3.

I know, I have to elaborate a little more, but in conclusion I think a second Nikon body is great, because you just bring along a single set of lenses. However I love the appeal of medium format, so probably next toy for tavelling around will be a Hassy why not?

Camera::Leica M4, summilux 50mm1.4
Film:Kodak Trix 400
Scanner:Epson V500, Epson Scan
Post Processing:Lightroom 3.3 and Photoshop Elements for the frame and dust removel

Multiple photo systems for the travel

Tiger vs Heineken (Penang – Malaysia)

Tiget vs Heineken
Tiget vs Heineken

The best part of the game should be to obtain the beer caps to play with ! Tiger is the Singaporean beer that is brewed under license all over South East Asia.

I brought the Leica and a couple of film rolls allong with the D700 in Penang, just did one film though, I’m slow on film this year (roll number 3). I’ll ellabrorate on the subject a bit longer in another post. Good fun to take the Leica out for a small trip, sure the ratio of keepers is higher that on my 500 digital shots.

Camera::Leica M4, summilux 50mm1.4
Film:Kodak Trix 400
Scanner:Epson V500, Epson Scan
Post Processing:Lightroom 3.3 and Photoshop Elements for the frame and dust removel

Tiger vs Heineken (Penang – Malaysia)

Temple in Penang

Temple in Penang
Mosaic on temple roof in Penang

This is a close up shot of the roof of a temple in Penang (Malaysia). The mosaic is made of broken piece of coloured china bowls.

Picture was taken with the D700, I have brought along the manual focus zoom Angenieux 70-200 F3.5. Not as practical as the nikkor 70-210 F2.8D, but a bit lighter. I realy like the look of this picture, really film like; the vigneting is out of the box. One funny thing, the focusing works the opposite way to the nikkor lenses so your have to turn your focusing ring the opposite way to what the rangefinder indicates.

Camera: Nikon D700
Lens: Angenieux 70-200 F3.5
Post Processing: Lightroom 3.3

Temple in Penang