The green corridor – Singapore

It’s already a coupe of years back since the railway station in Tanjong Pagar was closed moved to Woodlands close to the Malaysian border. To give an idea to the reader with no knowledge on Singapore geography, Tanjong Pagar in in the south side of the island and the border is at the north. For the small story the station, the tracks and the land below were Malaysian property. So a couple of years back, the station (see here) was closed, the tracks removed (and returned to Malaysia) and an exchange of land and other compensation was done. So was born the green corridor, the former railway from the south of Singapore to the border of Malaysia.

Sometime on August, after a brunch at Rider’s Cafe and a drive along the border with my friend Oliver, I was dropped at the former Bukit Timah railway station (in the middle of the corridor) and walked 10 KM south until I reach a “No trespassing” sign before getting to the old station area. I carried the Hassie with 2 backs and the Leica III (That will be for next post).

 

The bridge over Upper Bukit Timah road
The bridge over Upper Bukit Timah road

The bridge across Bukit Timah road and the railway station are the most interesting items to see, there lay the last meters of track.

The bridge over Upper Bukit Timah road
The bridge over Upper Bukit Timah road

After (or before) this point the green corridor is a dirt track between trees; very green and very blue this day as well.

The green and blue corridor
The green and blue corridor

The city is never far however and you can never forget the constructions nor the noise of the traffic. Maybe going upwards to Malaysia is different, but going south to the sea you can;t forget Singapore is a dense and busy city.

Habitation blocks along the green corridor
Habitation blocks along the green corridor

 

Color shots done with Fuji slides, 100 ISO. All scanned with Epson v500, adjusted with Lightroom 3.6.

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Bukit Brown Cemetery – The film shots – Singapore

Sikh Guard - Bukit Brown Chinese Cemetery - Singapore
Sikh Guard – Bukit Brown Chinese Cemetery – Singapore

Camera: Hasselblad 500CM
Lens: 80mm F2.8
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Scanner: Epson v500+Lightroom 3

The 3 films shot with the Hasselblad during out outing to Bukit Brown cemetery are are finally back from the lab. One of the best shots is this statue of a Sikh guard protecting a tomb (actually there are a pair of them). These were 3 different films, this one is an Ektar 100 which is probably the one that gave the best results, the portra 400 NC was not bad either, but I am disappointed with my first ever slide film, I’ll make another post on the subject.

Bukit Brown Cemetery – The film shots – Singapore

What’s in a walkaround camera?

Marina Bay Sands with flowers
Marina Bay Sands with flowers

So as promised, after the first, here is the scond film of the year. Sunday, the sky was a bit overcast but the weather overall nice. I was a bit ashamed of my low level of film photography since the beginning of the year, so I took advantage of the kind weather and go for a walk with a film camera.

I start by a look in the fridge to see which film there is, outdoor bit of sun let’s go for color, and the winner is a roll of Fuji Sensia 100 slides. Now let’s pick a camera; well I haven’t tried the 17-35mmF2.8 AFS on any film camera, so let’s try first with the Nikon F4s. It is not a light weight set-up as the combo weight about 3KG.

First problem, I haven’t used the F4 for so long (6 to 8 month maybe) that the batteries (6 x Duracell Alkaline AA) are flat and one had a small leak.) Lesson to remember: take the batteries off the camera before storing it back into the big Tupperware where it belongs. Fresh batteries in, turn the engine on: no luck. Remove the batteries clean the contact; iterate the operation 2 or 3 time and the beast finally turns on.

Now try to remember how to open the back and once done insert the film.

All set, ok not quite, I removed the Crumpler camo strap from the F4 to put it on the D700, so I have to grab the other plain Crumpler strap and put it on, carefully because I don’t want the damn thing to drop. I love the Crumpler straps, they feels good for a heavy combo, but it’s a pain to wrap around your wrists like we like to do from time to time.

First film of the year here we go 30 odd frames around the marina and a couple in Toa Payoh HDB.

What’s in a walkaround camera?